KK OUTLET GALLERY 2008

ARTOONS

Artoons is based on the observation that the relationship between cartoons and art sometimes appears a little one-sided. The likes of Roy Lichtenstein ensure that cartoons feature in art galleries, but do cartoons ever return the favour? Do works of art appear in kids comics? That’s what designer Krista Rozema wanted to find out. She trawled comics from Europe and America, finding dozens of often tiny paintings, sculptures and other objects in the houses and surroundings of cartoon characters. These miniscule works of art have been blown-up, and can now be admired on a massive scale.

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Camberwell gRAPHICS

Camberwell Graphics set up shop in KK Outlet, June 2008. It was an opportunity to buy limited edition products – ranging from prints and books, to t shirts and jewellery.

There was a lucky dip where customers could buy a surprise product for a fiver, each coming in its very own hand screen printed bag.

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CAPRICIOUS

Photography magazine Capricious is the first magazine that considers itself wide open for new, un-established photographers. Every issue is committed to connecting photography communities from all over the world, and showing how borders can be dissolved through images.

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DAMIEN POULAIN

For KK Outlet, Poulain has created a series of exclusive original pieces, partly inspired by a visit to the Outsider Art Gallery in Lausanne, Switzerland. Here, Poulain found himself deeply impressed by a breed of art untouched by mercantile aims. The art gallery’s pieces – produced by self-taught artists, the mentally ill and members of society’s fringe – had a lasting impact on Poulain, who found their free-wheeling style and desire to innovate highly appealing. Working with the newly acquired instincts of an Art Brut creative, he was prompted to produce a whole range of unapologetically challenging works. Among these are a number of strange posters collected under the title Y.E.S. The images here are of currency denominations (a Euro sign, a dollar, the Yen) sculpted from what appear to be wine corks. Closer inspection reveals skull-like faces and leering demon heads engraved into each cork. The overall effect is of a bizarre, pagan sculpture, a monument to a deity as inscrutable as he is brutal. Of course, that deity is money, our society’s Number One God.

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HANS EIJKELBOOM

At KK Outlet, Eijkelboom will display a new series titled Young Couples. The exhibition features 12 series of 9 photographs made on the streets of Paris (Chatelet-les Halles), New York (Times Square), Shanghai, and Amsterdam (Dam square). Like so much of Eijkelboom’s work, Young Couples adheres to a rigorous conceptual typology-enabling the viewer to compare and contrast the different people, settings, and details in the deceptively simple photographs.

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KIND

Kind Deluxe Knitwear is quirky and luxe in equal measure, its designs brimming with dark humour. The brand found a similar sensibility in photographers Melanie Bonajo and Anne de Vries, and commissioned the duo to photograph its clothes while they were still unknown in fashion. The collaboration continues with Different Image, which also features model/ artist Emmeline de Mooij; an archetypal Kind girl combining innocence with eroticism. As well as new pieces, KK Outlet’s show features a retrospective of early works and photographs.

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meindertsma
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shoreditch twat

For a period in the early 1990s when the dotcom boom was still a boom, Shoreditch was the epicenter of all things hip in the United Kingdom. Media luvvies thronged the area dreaming up guerilla marketing campaigns and drinking coffee. Essential reading, for finding out what was going on, as well as lampooning the new local residents was The Shoreditch Twat magazine.

Conceived in 1999 as a a listings magazine for Shoreditch nightclub 333, it quickly grew to become an irreverent, satirical fanzine. By 2002 it had grown so famous that Channel 4 Television and Talkback commissioned a one-off comedy show based on the magazine, which went on to win special mention at the 2003 Montreaux Comedy Award. The magazine survived for four years and thirty-one issues, during which time it survived three libel threats, sixteen defamation of character charges and seven fist fights.

Never Knowingly Understood presents an overview of the artwork of the magazine in all its low-quality glory. Jon and Mike are: Self-described as creative terrorists. they are reputed for their uncompromising style and savage humour.They exhibited in Stealing Beauty at the ICA, Jam II at The Barbican and were regulars at the V&A’s Village Fete.

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thomas mailaender

Mailaender’s “Acrobatic Squad” shows men risking life and limb in the name of fun. In each image, we see these somewhat unacrobatic looking acrobats striking posing atop their bikes, their faces tight with concentration. Their amateur choreography never lets you forget that this is a hobby, but a hobby undertaken with utmost seriousness.

As a bonus, KK Outlet also featured Thomas’ first foray into ceramics. These pieces are examples of what might be called Art Brut: wonky glazed vases adorned with strange photographs of battered and gurning faces. These odd images are off-set by trite patterns and garish colours.

Alongside his “Acrobatic Squad” series, Mailaender’s vases provide an insight into an artist amused by the humanity and absurdity of every day ambitions- whether that’s his own pottery or amateur motorcycle stunts.

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usefull photography #8

Pornographic films, websites and magazines all plough the same furrow, the repetition of the same act, in all its variations. Where they differ is their opening sequences, the patently fake and false scenarios, which are an afterthought to the main event.

The latest issue of Useful Photography celebrates these opening scenes, often cliche, sometimes bizarrely inventive, but always supremely fake. Taken out of context, (without the pornographic scenes that follow) they tell a different story. A story of amateur acting, and showcasing the talents of actors not usually noted for their acting. Innocence is truly relative as the images collected in Useful Photography #008 can testify. Humdrum scenes of chess playing, mucking out a horse’s stable or a job interview takes on supposedly sexual (but ultimately comical) overtones when the viewer is supplied with the knowledge of what is to come.

The annual magazine Useful Photography is the result of the shared fascination of Hans Aarsman, Claudie de Cleen, Julian Germain, Erik Kessels and Hans van der Meer. Useful Photography is the generic name for the millions of ephemeral photos, which are used daily and with a purpose all of their own; practical photography, often made by amateurs that has a clear function where the makers remain anonymous.

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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2008
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2009
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2010
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2011
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2012
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2013
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2014
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2015
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2016
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KK OUTLET GALLERY 2017
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Timberland
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Timberland
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